The universality of human beings in lebanon in the works of rania matar

For the first time, the sale will also More Georg Baselitz b. VIII, "Sujet populaire contraire"' on the reverse oil on canvas, x cm.

The universality of human beings in lebanon in the works of rania matar

Rania Matar at Tufts University. I was in the audience at the Tufts Art Gallery on November 1, as she discussed her work. Rania was born in Lebanon. In the s, she came to the United States to study architecture at Cornell, and to escape the war in Lebanon and its aftermath. Today, she lives in Massachusetts with her family, and frequently visits Lebanon for work.

Rania started taking photos in She was thirty-six, had just had her fourth child, and was staying home with her children. She came to photography as a way to document their childhoods.

» Rania Matar: Invisible Children at C. Grimaldis Gallery

Then came the terrorist attack of September 11, She was distressed by the story of the Middle East that subsequently unfolded in the media. Over the next four years, she built relationships with refugee women and girls in a Palestinian camp. She took their portraits in and near their homes — which had often been reduced to rubble.

She realized that she felt most comfortable taking photos of women and girls, as the process of photography is so physical and intimate. She was often standing over her subject to get the right angle or light, and this felt most comfortable with other women.

These years of work led to a beautiful body of black and white photography called Ordinary Lives. In her discussion of this work, Rania highlighted the changing norms in Lebanon around wearing the veil.

In the West, we often associate the veil with stories of oppression. But Rania emphasized that the real story is more nuanced. Women wear the veil not just for religious reasons, but also as a political statement or simply for fashion.

Inafter years of primarily taking photos in the Middle East, Rania and her children got stuck in Lebanon during the war. They were able to return to the U.

S for a while.The girl sits on a large bed, leaning back against the headboard with her legs pulled up against her chest protectively.

Tucked between two deep purple pillows that dwarf her frame, she stares into the camera. May 11,  · Rania Matar did not anticipate a career in photography when she first started making pictures of her kids in the late s.

Schooled as an architect and living in the suburbs of Boston, she started taking photography workshops while pregnant with her fourth grupobittia.coms: 6. focus of Ms. Rania Matar’s photography is the Middle East, women and children especially, and Lebanon in particular as the gateway to the region Her images try to capture the universality of the human being, people who somehow hang on to their humanity and dignity, expressing their never-say-die spirit as they continue with.

Her work shows a human universality across difference in opportunity. The girls are seen reading, putting on make-up, and standing awkwardly in their rooms. Their spaces range from colorful walls with shelves full of clothes, to bare walls with dangling electric wires.

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Students enjoy photographer Rania Matar’s work displayed at Tufts University. May 11,  · Rania Matar did not anticipate a career in photography when she first started making pictures of her kids in the late s. Schooled as an architect and living in the suburbs of Boston, she started taking photography workshops while pregnant with her fourth grupobittia.coms: 6.

The universality of human beings in lebanon in the works of rania matar

Christilla, Rabieh, Lebanon (c) Rania Matar and Carroll and Sons Gallery, Boston The bottle blonde teenager in tiny shorts and tank top is draped across a chair, staring cat-like at the camera. Her painted pink nails match the hot rose wall behind, upon which looms an outsized print of Marilyn Monroe luxuriating in white sheets.

Rania Matar: Tracing a Universal Womanhood | B&H Explora